Ancestral Journeys

Genealogical research and thoughts

Posts Tagged ‘Beginning Genealogy’

Pedigree Charts

Posted by dwsuddarth on 10 January 2010

Pedigree charts are a basic tool used in genealogical research.  They tell, at a glance, the direct line ancestors of an individual.  Additionally, they offer one an easy way to see what basic information is still needed for any particular individual in that line.

I am posting pedigree charts for all of my direct lines to help those who may share some of the same family names, as well as an illustration for beginners of what a pedigree chart looks like.  The numbering of the chart is very simple.  The person you begin with is always number 1.  That person’s father is number 2 and the mother is number 3.  Numbering continues in this manner with the father of a certain individual always being that individual’s number times 2 and the mother being the individual’s number times 2, plus 1.  Except for the first person, the males will always have an even number and the females will always have an odd number.

I have four different pedigree charts, one for each grandparent.  In this way, I can organize my filing system into four main families, each with a different color coding for its files.  The first one is for my grandmother’s family line, the Monroes.  Names included in this chart are Monroe, Studebaker, McLaughlin,Stilwell, Robertson, Hart, Locke and Braton.  As you can see, a four generation pedigree chart will yield 8 different surnames.

The following link will take you to the Monroe family page, where you can access the pedigree chart: Monroe Family

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William Hart Monroe – 1930 Census

Posted by dwsuddarth on 23 November 2009

When searching census records, I make up a census inventory for each person.  That way, I have a record of what census records I have found and where they were living in each of those years.  For William, I started with the 1930 census.

Knowing where the family was from (I know where my grandmother was born), it was not difficult to find the 1930, 1920, 1910 and 1900 census records.  In 1930, the family is enumerated in the city of Marseilles, Manlius Township, LaSalle County, Illinois.  From the census, I get the following information:

The family is living at 850 Washington Street in the town of Marseilles, Illinois.  William H. Munroe [sic] is the head of the household.  He is renting the house that his family is living in for $20 per month and they do not own a radio set.  Many of his neighbors, with a couple of exceptions, are also renting their homes and do not have radios in the home.  William is listed as 49 years old, making him born around 1881.  This is right in line with the birth date of 17 October 1880 that I found in the family history book.  Further information on the census states that he was 22 years old when married.  If he was born in 1880, that would put his marriage date in 1902.  Again, that is right where it should be if the book I have is correct.  Then things begin to get interesting.  According to the census, William was born in Scotland, as was his father.  His mother was born in Ireland.  This means that William must have immigrated to the US at some point.  Looking further in the census, his wife, Elsie was born in Illinois.  Therefore, William most likely immigrated before 1902, the year of his marriage.  Unfortunately, the column on the 1930 census which is to be used to record year of immigration contains a number 1 in a circle, not a date.  In addition, the column which is to be used to record naturalization contains ‘Un’ for unknown.  Finally, from the 1930 census, we learn that William is working as a laborer in a carton factory.

Other members of the household include the following:

Name

Relationship

Age

Place of Birth

Occupation

Elsie Wife 46 Illinois None

William Jr.

Son 22 Illinois Pipe Fitter – Carton Factory
James Son 18 Illinois Laborer – Dairy
Estaline Daughter 17 Illinois None
Augustus Son 14 Illinois None
Cecil Son 12 Illinois None
Robert Son 9 Illinois None
Elsie Mae Daughter 5 Illinois None

From this census record, I can begin to fill in the pieces of William’s life and begin to verify some of the information I already have.  In addition, this census tells me that I should consider trying to find more information regarding his immigration.  I also am going to need to begin studying up on Scotland and the records which may be available to me there, particularly a birth record for William.  First, though, I need to find the other census records to see what else I can learn about William.

William H. Munroe Household, 1930 Census

Click image to view

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The Monroe Family – Beginning the Search

Posted by dwsuddarth on 23 November 2009

I recently dug out an old family history that I was given back in 1979 at a family reunion.  This family history was done to document my father’s mother’s side of the family.  Looking through it has prompted me to begin researching this line in more depth.

My great grandfather’s name was William Hart Monroe.  According to the family history I have, William was born 17 October 1880.  He married Elsie Belle Studebaker 26 November 1902.  William and Elsie had twelve children, the second being my grandmother, Mary Ellen (Mae) Monroe.  According to the family history book I have, William died 15 November 1948.  In addition, the book names his parents as William Monroe (no birth or death dates given) and Anna McLaughlin (12 May 1851 – 17 November 1920).  No other information is given for this line.

Since there are no sources mentioned in the book, I need to verify the information given.  The first thing I always do when beginning a new line is try to find all census records which pertain to the person I am researching.  Since William was born in October 1880, he should not be listed on the 1880 census.  Therefore, I need to find census records for William for 1930, 1920, 1910 and 1900.  Once I find those records, I can see what information is on them and see where to go next.

Posted in Methodology, Monroe | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

 
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