Ancestral Journeys

Genealogical research and thoughts

Pedigree Charts

Posted by dwsuddarth on 10 January 2010

Pedigree charts are a basic tool used in genealogical research.  They tell, at a glance, the direct line ancestors of an individual.  Additionally, they offer one an easy way to see what basic information is still needed for any particular individual in that line.

I am posting pedigree charts for all of my direct lines to help those who may share some of the same family names, as well as an illustration for beginners of what a pedigree chart looks like.  The numbering of the chart is very simple.  The person you begin with is always number 1.  That person’s father is number 2 and the mother is number 3.  Numbering continues in this manner with the father of a certain individual always being that individual’s number times 2 and the mother being the individual’s number times 2, plus 1.  Except for the first person, the males will always have an even number and the females will always have an odd number.

I have four different pedigree charts, one for each grandparent.  In this way, I can organize my filing system into four main families, each with a different color coding for its files.  The first one is for my grandmother’s family line, the Monroes.  Names included in this chart are Monroe, Studebaker, McLaughlin,Stilwell, Robertson, Hart, Locke and Braton.  As you can see, a four generation pedigree chart will yield 8 different surnames.

The following link will take you to the Monroe family page, where you can access the pedigree chart: Monroe Family

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William Hart Monroe – Census Returns

Posted by dwsuddarth on 2 January 2010

Having looked at the 1930 census for William Monroe, I looked at the 1920, 1910, and 1900 census returns.  In 1920, the family is enumerated in Farm Ridge Township and is living on a farm, which William owns.  He is listed as being 39 years of age, from Scotland.  The columns which specify his naturalization and year of immigration are marked “Un” for unknown.  Also enumerated in the household are the following:

  • Elsie, wife, age 35, born in Illinois
  • Gladys, daughter, age 16, born in Illinois
  • May, daughter, age 15, born in Illinois
  • Ruth, daughter, age 13, born in Illinois
  • Will, son, age 12, born in Illinois
  • Douglas, son, age 8, born in Illinois
  • Estaline, daughter, age 6, born in Illinois
  • Augustus, son, age 4, born in Illinois
  • Cecil, son, age 2, born in Illinois

Comparing this data with the information from the 1930 census, I notice that Gladys, May and Ruth are children which are not found in 1930.  It is most likely that these three daughters had married by 1930.  In addition, there is a Douglas enumerated in 1920, but not in 1930.  There is also a James in 1930 which is not found in the 1920 census.  These do happen to be the same person, as James’ middle name was Douglas.  All the other children match the 1930 census.

In 1910, the family is again enumerated in Farm Ridge Township, on a farm.  The family unit appears to agree with the other census records.  In addition, William’s year of immigration is noted as 1888 (the number is very difficult to make out; it could be 1880, 1881, 1885, 1886 or 1888).  Enumerated next to William is a Mrs. Anna Monroe, age 62, born in Ireland.  She is widowed and is listed as the head of household.  There is also a James Monroe, age 27, living in the household and is listed as her son.  It is very likely that this is William’s mother.

In the 1900 census, William is found in Farm Ridge Township working as a Farm Laborer on the farm of Fred Munns.  His date of birth is listed as Oct. 1881 and his year of immigration is listed as 1886.  He is listed as a naturalized citizen.

Having found William in the 1900, 1910, 1920 and 1930 censuses, it is time to begin putting together and correlating what has been learned.

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William Hart Monroe – 1930 Census

Posted by dwsuddarth on 23 November 2009

When searching census records, I make up a census inventory for each person.  That way, I have a record of what census records I have found and where they were living in each of those years.  For William, I started with the 1930 census.

Knowing where the family was from (I know where my grandmother was born), it was not difficult to find the 1930, 1920, 1910 and 1900 census records.  In 1930, the family is enumerated in the city of Marseilles, Manlius Township, LaSalle County, Illinois.  From the census, I get the following information:

The family is living at 850 Washington Street in the town of Marseilles, Illinois.  William H. Munroe [sic] is the head of the household.  He is renting the house that his family is living in for $20 per month and they do not own a radio set.  Many of his neighbors, with a couple of exceptions, are also renting their homes and do not have radios in the home.  William is listed as 49 years old, making him born around 1881.  This is right in line with the birth date of 17 October 1880 that I found in the family history book.  Further information on the census states that he was 22 years old when married.  If he was born in 1880, that would put his marriage date in 1902.  Again, that is right where it should be if the book I have is correct.  Then things begin to get interesting.  According to the census, William was born in Scotland, as was his father.  His mother was born in Ireland.  This means that William must have immigrated to the US at some point.  Looking further in the census, his wife, Elsie was born in Illinois.  Therefore, William most likely immigrated before 1902, the year of his marriage.  Unfortunately, the column on the 1930 census which is to be used to record year of immigration contains a number 1 in a circle, not a date.  In addition, the column which is to be used to record naturalization contains ‘Un’ for unknown.  Finally, from the 1930 census, we learn that William is working as a laborer in a carton factory.

Other members of the household include the following:

Name

Relationship

Age

Place of Birth

Occupation

Elsie Wife 46 Illinois None

William Jr.

Son 22 Illinois Pipe Fitter – Carton Factory
James Son 18 Illinois Laborer – Dairy
Estaline Daughter 17 Illinois None
Augustus Son 14 Illinois None
Cecil Son 12 Illinois None
Robert Son 9 Illinois None
Elsie Mae Daughter 5 Illinois None

From this census record, I can begin to fill in the pieces of William’s life and begin to verify some of the information I already have.  In addition, this census tells me that I should consider trying to find more information regarding his immigration.  I also am going to need to begin studying up on Scotland and the records which may be available to me there, particularly a birth record for William.  First, though, I need to find the other census records to see what else I can learn about William.

William H. Munroe Household, 1930 Census

Click image to view

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The Monroe Family – Beginning the Search

Posted by dwsuddarth on 23 November 2009

I recently dug out an old family history that I was given back in 1979 at a family reunion.  This family history was done to document my father’s mother’s side of the family.  Looking through it has prompted me to begin researching this line in more depth.

My great grandfather’s name was William Hart Monroe.  According to the family history I have, William was born 17 October 1880.  He married Elsie Belle Studebaker 26 November 1902.  William and Elsie had twelve children, the second being my grandmother, Mary Ellen (Mae) Monroe.  According to the family history book I have, William died 15 November 1948.  In addition, the book names his parents as William Monroe (no birth or death dates given) and Anna McLaughlin (12 May 1851 – 17 November 1920).  No other information is given for this line.

Since there are no sources mentioned in the book, I need to verify the information given.  The first thing I always do when beginning a new line is try to find all census records which pertain to the person I am researching.  Since William was born in October 1880, he should not be listed on the 1880 census.  Therefore, I need to find census records for William for 1930, 1920, 1910 and 1900.  Once I find those records, I can see what information is on them and see where to go next.

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Updates

Posted by dwsuddarth on 7 November 2009

I have updated and continue to work on the Suddarth pages of this site.  I have added pages for James Suddarth, born 1795 in Virginia, who I have discussed quite a bit on the blog.  In addition, I have put in a page for Patience Suddarth.  I don’t know much about Patience.  I think she may be the mother of Lewis Suddarth, but I really do not have anything to support that theory other than the 1820 Crawford County, Indiana census.  I do not feel that this is enough to state anything regarding the relationship between Patience and Lewis.

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Pictures

Posted by dwsuddarth on 31 October 2009

I was at my parent’s house recently and was going through some old pictures with my father.  There were two which I was especially excited to find.  I was fortunate in that both of them were labeled by my grandmother when she gave them to my father.

The first is of my second great-grandfather (my father’s mother’s paternal grandfather), William Monroe. Although I do not know too much about this line yet, I do know that William was born in Scotland and came to the United States sometime after 1880, settling in LaSalle County, Illinois.

William Monroe

William Monroe

The second picture is of my great-grandmother (my father’s mother’s mother), Elsie Belle Studebaker. Elsie was the daughter of Jacob Studebaker and Mary Jane Stilwell. Elsie was born in 1884 in LaSalle County, Illinois and married William Monroe’s son, William Hart Monroe, born 1880 in Scotland. William and Elsie had 12 children, one of whom was my grandmother, Mary Ellen Monroe, born 1904 in LaSalle County, Illinois.

Elsie Belle Studebaker

Elsie Belle Studebaker

Although not in the best shape (I believe they are actually photos of tintypes or ambrotypes), it is still exciting to find these pictures. I have made copies of them and have stored them in a safe place, so that future generations may also be able to enjoy them.

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Is James the Father of Lewis?

Posted by dwsuddarth on 31 October 2009

I have been searching for the parents of my third great-grandfather, Lewis Suddarth, for many years now.  It seems to be one of those problems that just does not want to be solved.  Having run into a dead-end in trying to research Lewis, I have begun researching other Suddarths who lived in southern Indiana at the same time as Lewis, hoping that by doing so, I may learn more about Lewis.

The first person I decided to research who would seem to have a connection to Lewis is James Suddarth, thinking he may be a brother.  Throughout the years that I have been researching the Suddarth family, however, I have heard and found posted online that James is Lewis’ father.  The only reason I have ever seen for making this connection is that James is the only Suddarth in southern Indiana who is old enough to be Lewis’ father.  So, has the solution to my puzzle been right under my nose all the time?  Is James the father of Lewis?

I have written quite a lot about James on this blog.  James was born 22 March 1795 in Virginia.  His wife, Malinda, was born 13 September 1797 in Kentucky.  These dates come from the grave marker for James and Malinda located in the Marengo Cemetery in Marengo, Indiana.  According to all census records for Lewis, he was born about 1812 in Kentucky.  Therefore, when Lewis was born, James would have been 17 years of age and Malinda, 15 years of age.  Although I believe this to be unlikely, it is a definite possibility.

Looking at census records for James, I have found the following:

1820 Crawford County, Indiana -

  • 1 male 26 to 45
  • 2 or 3 females under 10
  • 1 female 16 to 26

There are no males Lewis’ age listed in James’ household in 1820.  If James was the father, we would expect to see at least 1 male under 10 enumerated.

1830 Crawford County, Indiana -

  • 2 males under 5
  • 1 male 30 to 40
  • 1 female under 5
  • 1 female 10 to 15
  • 1 female 30 to 40

Again, there are no males Lewis’ age listed in James’ household in 1830.  If James was the father, we would expect to see at least 1 male 15 to 20 enumerated.  The only male children in the household are under 5, too young for Lewis.
Lewis married in August 1839 and is enumerated as head of household in 1840:

1840 Crawford County, Indiana -

  • 1 male 20 to 30
  • 1 female 20 to 30

Is it possible that the enumerator just put Lewis in the wrong column in 1830?  I believe this to be highly unlikely, but let’s look at the 1850 census for James:

1850 Crawford County, Indiana -

  • James Suddarth, age 55, born Virginia
  • Malinda Suddarth, age 55, born Kentucky
  • David Suddarth, age 19, born Crawford County
  • James Suddarth, age 15, born Crawford County

It is clear from the 1850 census that the 2 males under 5 listed in the 1830 census are David and James and that Lewis was not a member of the household in 1830.

Based on a very simple and brief analysis of census records, I do not believe that James is the father of Lewis.  Of course, there is always the possibility that Lewis was not living in his father’s household, but I have found no records to indicate that this would be the case.  I believe saying that James is the father because he is the only Suddarth in the area who is old enough does not take into consideration evidence readily available in the census records.  Thus, I will continue my search for Lewis’ father.

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Using Tax Lists

Posted by dwsuddarth on 12 October 2009

Tax lists can help your research in many ways.  Because taxes were collected annually, they can help to fill in the years between census enumerations.  In addition, in most cases, they can provide information regarding land and property ownership.

James Suddarth enlisted in the Kentucky Militia in 1813 for the War of 1812.  He enlisted on 1 January 1813 at Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky.  He then enlisted again on 18 August 1813 in Casey County, Kentucky.  I consulted the Casey County, Kentucky tax lists and found the following:

NAME YEAR COUNTY AGE
Sutherds, John 1809 Casey above 21
Suddith, John 1812 Casey above 21
Sudderath, James 1812 Casey above 21
Suddearth, John 1813 Casey above 21
Suddearth, James 1813 Casey under 21
Suddearth, John 1814 Casey above 21
Suddearth, James 1814 Casey under 21
Suddearth, John 1815 Casey above 21
Suddith, John 1817 Casey 2 above 21

James first appears in 1812.  He is listed as above age 21.  However, the James I am looking for was born in 1795, making him only 17 in 1812.  He would not have been 21 until 1816.  All the other years in which he appears, he is listed as under age 21.  In the Casey County, Kentucky Court Orders Book 1, 1806-1817, page 250, the following appears:

June the 27th 1814

Satisfactory proof being made to the Court that James Southerd stands charged with the County for two tithes one in 1812 and the other in 1813. when he was really under age it is therefore ordered that the sheriff of this County have a credit for said tithes in his collection of the County levy.

Even though James was listed as above age 21 in 1812, this document tells us that he was actually under 21.  This document also states that even though he was listed as under 21 in 1813, he was still taxed.

Further examination of the tax lists show that  John did not own any land (he was not taxed for any land).  If this is true, there would be no land records to assist in locating and tracing him.

However, from the tax lists, it appears that John may be the father of James.  With this new information, I will begin a search of all available records for a John Suddarth in Casey County, Kentucky.

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A Recap of James Suddarth’s Military Service

Posted by dwsuddarth on 6 October 2009

In the last few posts, I have transcribed James Suddarth’s applications for bounty land.  He was eligible for this bounty land because of service in the War of 1812.

What I have found out is that he originally enlisted in the Kentucky State Militia in Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky on the first of January, 1813 for a period of three months.  During this time, he served as a pack horse driver under Captain Higgins.  He continued in this service until about March 20, when he received an honorable discharge on account of being sick.  He was discharged in Dayton, Ohio and made his way back home where he stayed for the summer.

On about the 17th of August, 1813, he re-enlisted at the Casey County courthouse in Casey County, Kentucky, again for a term of three months.  He served as a Corporal in the Company commanded by Captain Jesse Coffey in the 6th Regiment of Kentucky Militia.  During this service he was in the Battle of the Themes in Canada.  James never received his discharge after his three month term on account of being sick with the measles.  He was forced to spend time at Nicholasville, Kentucky, near Lexington due to his illness.  Upon returning home, he attempted to obtain his certificate of discharge by calling at the home of Jesse Coffey two different times, but was unable to obtain the certificate due to Coffey not being at home.

I decided to contact the National Archives to see if, by chance, they had any more information regarding James’ service.  Since he was in a state militia, there are no Federal records of his service.  All records, including enlistment records and muster rolls, would be held at the state level.  I then contacted the Kentucky Military History Museum in Frankfort, Kentucky to find where these records may be located.

The news I received was not what I wanted.  Kentucky destroyed all of its military records in 1874 for all wars prior to the Civil War.   This was done to make room for the vast amount of files which were being created for Civil War service.  They needed more space to store those files.  Making a listing of all soldiers who served in prior wars (the Adjutant General’s Report), they then proceeded to destroy all older records.

Even though I have not been able to find any information regarding who James’ parents are, looking through the bounty land application file has been interesting.  In addition, it has added more to my understanding of James.  He is more than just a name and date.  His military service is just the kind of thing which makes family history research so interesting.

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James Suddarth – Application for Bounty Land, Part 3

Posted by dwsuddarth on 3 October 2009

James Suddarth applied for bounty land once again in 1855. This is a transcription of that application.

State of Indiana
Crawford County

On the 20th day of April A.D. 1855 personally appeared before me William A. Jackson clerk of the Crawford Circuit Court in said state, duly authorized to administer oaths generally within and for the court county and state aforesaid, James Suddarth, aged sixty years, a resident of Crawford County in the state of Indiana, who being duly sworn according to law, declares that he is the identical James Suddarth, who was a Corporal in the Company commanded by Captain Jesse Coffey in the 6th Regiment of Kentucky Militia commanded by Colonel _________ Davenport, in war with Great Britain declared by the United States on the 18th day of June 1812, that he volunteered at Casey County in the state of Kentucky on or about the 17th day of August A.D. 1813, for the term of three months, and continued in actual service in said war under said Captain for the term of three months, that he never received a discharge for the reason that on the day the other soldiers in said company were discharged, he was sick of the measles & not able to be mustered out of service; He refers to the muster rolls of said company for evidence of the facts as stated above. He was in the battle of the Thomes. He also inlisted in the Pack Horse service in said war under Captain Higgins, at Lexington in the state of Kentucky, on or about the 1st day of January A.D. 1813, for the term of three months and continued in actual service as Pack Horse man, in said war for the term of at least two and a half months, and was honorably discharged at Dayton in the state of Ohio on or about the 20th day of March A.D. 1813, on account of being sick, which discharge for the last named service was heretofore forwarded to the Commissioner of Pensions for the purpose of procuring a land warrant under act of 28 September 1850.

He makes this declaration for the purpose of obtaining the bounty land to which he may be entitled under the “act granting additional bounty land to certain officers and soldiers who have been engaged in the military service of the United States” approved March 3, 1855, And he refers to his former declarations made under act of 28 September 1850, upon which he obtained a Land Warrant No (not remembered) for 40 acres which he having legally transfered and disposed of, is not within his person now to return.

He further declares that he has not received a warrant for bounty land under any act of Congress, nor made any application therefor, except as above stated.

James Suddarth


Sworn to, subscribed and acknowledged before me the day and year first above written, and on the same day personally came before me William Sanders and R. D. Tucker residents of Crawford county in the state of Indiana to me well person as credible witnesses who being duly sworn according to law, declare that they are personally and well acquainted with James Suddarth; who has made and subscribed the foregoing declaration, And that from their personal acquaintance with him they believe that he is the identical person who performed the military services herein named, and who has received a warrant therefor, and they further swear that they are disinterested witnesses in his claim.

R D Tucker
William Sander

Sworn to and subscribed before me, and I certify that I am not interested in the claim or concerned in its prosecution, and I believe that the claimant is the person he represents himself to be.

In witness of which I hereunto set my hand and the seal of said court (the same being a court of record possessing general jurisdiction) at Leavenworth this 20 day of April 1855

Wm A. Jackson (signature) Clerk
Crawford Cir Court

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